Commit 9c3022b6 authored by Sergey Kandaurov's avatar Sergey Kandaurov
Browse files

Vendor import of tzdata2014f.

- Russia time zone changes.
- New zones: Asia/Chita and Asia/Srednekolymsk.
- Lots of changes wrt. time zone abbreviations and historical data.
- New zone tab data format.

Obtained from:	ftp://ftp.iana.org/tz/releases/
parent 5557748a
This diff is collapsed.
# <pre>
# This file is in the public domain, so clarified as of
# 2009-05-17 by Arthur David Olson.
# From Paul Eggert (1999-11-15):
# To keep things manageable, we list only locations occupied year-round; see
# <a href="http://www.comnap.aq/comnap/comnap.nsf/P/Stations/">
# COMNAP - Stations and Bases
# </a>
# <http://www.comnap.aq/comnap/comnap.nsf/P/Stations/>
# and
# <a href="http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/bob/periant.htm">
# Summary of the Peri-Antarctic Islands (1998-07-23)
# </a>
# <http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/bob/periant.htm>
# for information.
# Unless otherwise specified, we have no time zone information.
#
......@@ -55,19 +52,19 @@ Rule ChileAQ 2012 max - Sep Sun>=2 4:00u 1:00 S
# Argentina - year-round bases
# Belgrano II, Confin Coast, -770227-0343737, since 1972-02-05
# Esperanza, San Martin Land, -6323-05659, since 1952-12-17
# Jubany, Potter Peninsula, King George Island, -6414-0602320, since 1982-01
# Marambio, Seymour I, -6414-05637, since 1969-10-29
# Carlini, Potter Cove, King George Island, -6414-0602320, since 1982-01
# Esperanza, Hope Bay, -6323-05659, since 1952-12-17
# Marambio, -6414-05637, since 1969-10-29
# Orcadas, Laurie I, -6016-04444, since 1904-02-22
# San Martin, Debenham I, -6807-06708, since 1951-03-21
# San Martín, Barry I, -6808-06706, since 1951-03-21
# (except 1960-03 / 1976-03-21)
# Australia - territories
# Heard Island, McDonald Islands (uninhabited)
# previously sealers and scientific personnel wintered
# <a href="http://web.archive.org/web/20021204222245/http://www.dstc.qut.edu.au/DST/marg/daylight.html">
# Margaret Turner reports
# </a> (1999-09-30) that they're UTC+5, with no DST;
# <http://web.archive.org/web/20021204222245/http://www.dstc.qut.edu.au/DST/marg/daylight.html>
# (1999-09-30) that they're UTC+5, with no DST;
# presumably this is when they have visitors.
#
# year-round bases
......@@ -84,14 +81,10 @@ Rule ChileAQ 2012 max - Sep Sun>=2 4:00u 1:00 S
# The changes occurred on 2009-10-18 at 02:00 (local times).
#
# Government source: (Australian Antarctic Division)
# <a href="http://www.aad.gov.au/default.asp?casid=37079">
# http://www.aad.gov.au/default.asp?casid=37079
# </a>
#
# We have more background information here:
# <a href="http://www.timeanddate.com/news/time/antarctica-new-times.html">
# http://www.timeanddate.com/news/time/antarctica-new-times.html
# </a>
# From Steffen Thorsen (2010-03-10):
# We got these changes from the Australian Antarctic Division: ...
......@@ -106,19 +99,17 @@ Rule ChileAQ 2012 max - Sep Sun>=2 4:00u 1:00 S
# - Mawson station stays on UTC+5.
#
# Background:
# <a href="http://www.timeanddate.com/news/time/antartica-time-changes-2010.html">
# http://www.timeanddate.com/news/time/antartica-time-changes-2010.html
# </a>
# Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]
Zone Antarctica/Casey 0 - zzz 1969
8:00 - WST 2009 Oct 18 2:00
# Western (Aus) Standard Time
8:00 - AWST 2009 Oct 18 2:00
# Australian Western Std Time
11:00 - CAST 2010 Mar 5 2:00
# Casey Time
8:00 - WST 2011 Oct 28 2:00
8:00 - AWST 2011 Oct 28 2:00
11:00 - CAST 2012 Feb 21 17:00u
8:00 - WST
8:00 - AWST
Zone Antarctica/Davis 0 - zzz 1957 Jan 13
7:00 - DAVT 1964 Nov # Davis Time
0 - zzz 1969 Feb
......@@ -132,24 +123,27 @@ Zone Antarctica/Mawson 0 - zzz 1954 Feb 13
# Mawson Time
5:00 - MAWT
# References:
# <a href="http://www.antdiv.gov.au/aad/exop/sfo/casey/casey_aws.html">
# Casey Weather (1998-02-26)
# </a>
# <a href="http://www.antdiv.gov.au/aad/exop/sfo/davis/video.html">
# <http://www.antdiv.gov.au/aad/exop/sfo/casey/casey_aws.html>
# Davis Station, Antarctica (1998-02-26)
# </a>
# <a href="http://www.antdiv.gov.au/aad/exop/sfo/mawson/video.html">
# <http://www.antdiv.gov.au/aad/exop/sfo/davis/video.html>
# Mawson Station, Antarctica (1998-02-25)
# </a>
# <http://www.antdiv.gov.au/aad/exop/sfo/mawson/video.html>
# Belgium - year-round base
# Princess Elisabeth, Queen Maud Land, -713412+0231200, since 2007
# Brazil - year-round base
# Comandante Ferraz, King George Island, -6205+05824, since 1983/4
# Ferraz, King George Island, -6205+05824, since 1983/4
# Bulgaria - year-round base
# St. Kliment Ohridski, Livingston Island, -623829-0602153, since 1988
# Chile - year-round bases and towns
# Escudero, South Shetland Is, -621157-0585735, since 1994
# Presidente Eduadro Frei, King George Island, -6214-05848, since 1969-03-07
# General Bernardo O'Higgins, Antarctic Peninsula, -6319-05704, since 1948-02
# Capitan Arturo Prat, -6230-05941
# Frei Montalva, King George Island, -6214-05848, since 1969-03-07
# O'Higgins, Antarctic Peninsula, -6319-05704, since 1948-02
# Prat, -6230-05941
# Villa Las Estrellas (a town), around the Frei base, since 1984-04-09
# These locations have always used Santiago time; use TZ='America/Santiago'.
......@@ -157,31 +151,35 @@ Zone Antarctica/Mawson 0 - zzz 1954 Feb 13
# Great Wall, King George Island, -6213-05858, since 1985-02-20
# Zhongshan, Larsemann Hills, Prydz Bay, -6922+07623, since 1989-02-26
# France - year-round bases
# France - year-round bases (also see "France & Italy")
#
# From Antoine Leca (1997-01-20):
# Time data are from Nicole Pailleau at the IFRTP
# (French Institute for Polar Research and Technology).
# She confirms that French Southern Territories and Terre Adelie bases
# don't observe daylight saving time, even if Terre Adelie supplies came
# She confirms that French Southern Territories and Terre Adélie bases
# don't observe daylight saving time, even if Terre Adélie supplies came
# from Tasmania.
#
# French Southern Territories with year-round inhabitants
#
# Martin-de-Vivies Base, Amsterdam Island, -374105+0773155, since 1950
# Alfred-Faure Base, Crozet Islands, -462551+0515152, since 1964
# Port-aux-Francais, Kerguelen Islands, -492110+0701303, since 1951;
# Alfred Faure, Possession Island, Crozet Islands, -462551+0515152, since 1964;
# sealing & whaling stations operated variously 1802/1911+;
# see Indian/Reunion.
#
# Martin-de-Viviès, Amsterdam Island, -374105+0773155, since 1950
# Port-aux-Français, Kerguelen Islands, -492110+0701303, since 1951;
# whaling & sealing station operated 1908/1914, 1920/1929, and 1951/1956
#
# St Paul Island - near Amsterdam, uninhabited
# fishing stations operated variously 1819/1931
#
# Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]
Zone Indian/Kerguelen 0 - zzz 1950 # Port-aux-Francais
Zone Indian/Kerguelen 0 - zzz 1950 # Port-aux-Français
5:00 - TFT # ISO code TF Time
#
# year-round base in the main continent
# Dumont-d'Urville, Ile des Petrels, -6640+14001, since 1956-11
# Dumont d'Urville, Île des Pétrels, -6640+14001, since 1956-11
# <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumont_d'Urville_Station> (2005-12-05)
#
# Another base at Port-Martin, 50km east, began operation in 1947.
# It was destroyed by fire on 1952-01-14.
......@@ -191,20 +189,22 @@ Zone Antarctica/DumontDUrville 0 - zzz 1947
10:00 - PMT 1952 Jan 14 # Port-Martin Time
0 - zzz 1956 Nov
10:00 - DDUT # Dumont-d'Urville Time
# Reference:
# <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumont_d'Urville_Station">
# Dumont d'Urville Station (2005-12-05)
# </a>
# France & Italy - year-round base
# Concordia, -750600+1232000, since 2005
# Germany - year-round base
# Georg von Neumayer, -7039-00815
# Neumayer III, -704080-0081602, since 2009
# India - year-round base
# Dakshin Gangotri, -7005+01200
# India - year-round bases
# Bharati, -692428+0761114, since 2012
# Maitri, -704558+0114356, since 1989
# Italy - year-round base (also see "France & Italy")
# Zuchelli, Terra Nova Bay, -744140+1640647, since 1986
# Japan - year-round bases
# Dome Fuji, -7719+03942
# Syowa, -690022+0393524
# Syowa (also known as Showa), -690022+0393524, since 1957
#
# From Hideyuki Suzuki (1999-02-06):
# In all Japanese stations, +0300 is used as the standard time.
......@@ -216,11 +216,11 @@ Zone Antarctica/DumontDUrville 0 - zzz 1947
Zone Antarctica/Syowa 0 - zzz 1957 Jan 29
3:00 - SYOT # Syowa Time
# See:
# <a href="http://www.nipr.ac.jp/english/ara01.html">
# NIPR Antarctic Research Activities (1999-08-17)
# </a>
# <http://www.nipr.ac.jp/english/ara01.html>
# S Korea - year-round base
# Jang Bogo, Terra Nova Bay, -743700+1641205 since 2014
# King Sejong, King George Island, -6213-05847, since 1988
# New Zealand - claims
......@@ -269,6 +269,9 @@ Zone Antarctica/Troll 0 - zzz 2005 Feb 12
# Poland - year-round base
# Arctowski, King George Island, -620945-0582745, since 1977
# Romania - year-bound base
# Law-Racoviță, Larsemann Hills, -692319+0762251, since 1986
# Russia - year-round bases
# Bellingshausen, King George Island, -621159-0585337, since 1968-02-22
# Mirny, Davis coast, -6633+09301, since 1956-02
......@@ -278,8 +281,8 @@ Zone Antarctica/Troll 0 - zzz 2005 Feb 12
# year-round from 1960/61 to 1992
# Vostok, since 1957-12-16, temporarily closed 1994-02/1994-11
# <a href="http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/antarctica/QA/computers/Directions,Time,ZIP">
# From Craig Mundell (1994-12-15)</a>:
# From Craig Mundell (1994-12-15)
# <http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/antarctica/QA/computers/Directions,Time,ZIP>:
# Vostok, which is one of the Russian stations, is set on the same
# time as Moscow, Russia.
#
......@@ -294,7 +297,7 @@ Zone Antarctica/Troll 0 - zzz 2005 Feb 12
#
# From Paul Eggert (2001-05-04):
# This seems to be hopelessly confusing, so I asked Lee Hotz about it
# in person. He said that some Antartic locations set their local
# in person. He said that some Antarctic locations set their local
# time so that noon is the warmest part of the day, and that this
# changes during the year and does not necessarily correspond to mean
# solar noon. So the Vostok time might have been whatever the clocks
......@@ -306,9 +309,12 @@ Zone Antarctica/Vostok 0 - zzz 1957 Dec 16
# S Africa - year-round bases
# Marion Island, -4653+03752
# Sanae, -7141-00250
# SANAE IV, Vesleskarvet, Queen Maud Land, -714022-0025026, since 1997
# Ukraine - year-round base
# Vernadsky (formerly Faraday), Galindez Island, -651445-0641526, since 1954
# UK
# United Kingdom
#
# British Antarctic Territories (BAT) claims
# South Orkney Islands
......@@ -364,7 +370,7 @@ Zone Antarctica/Palmer 0 - zzz 1965
# but that he found it more convenient to keep GMT+12
# as supplies for the station were coming from McMurdo Sound,
# which was on GMT+12 because New Zealand was on GMT+12 all year
# at that time (1957). (Source: Siple's book 90 degrees SOUTH.)
# at that time (1957). (Source: Siple's book 90 Degrees South.)
#
# From Susan Smith
# http://www.cybertours.com/whs/pole10.html
......
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# <pre>
# This file is in the public domain, so clarified as of
# 2009-05-17 by Arthur David Olson.
......@@ -6,7 +5,7 @@
# and their old names. Many names changed in late 1993.
Link Africa/Asmara Africa/Asmera
Link Africa/Bamako Africa/Timbuktu
Link Africa/Abidjan Africa/Timbuktu
Link America/Argentina/Catamarca America/Argentina/ComodRivadavia
Link America/Adak America/Atka
Link America/Argentina/Buenos_Aires America/Buenos_Aires
......@@ -27,8 +26,11 @@ Link America/Port_of_Spain America/Virgin
Link Pacific/Auckland Antarctica/South_Pole
Link Asia/Ashgabat Asia/Ashkhabad
Link Asia/Kolkata Asia/Calcutta
Link Asia/Chongqing Asia/Chungking
Link Asia/Shanghai Asia/Chongqing
Link Asia/Shanghai Asia/Chungking
Link Asia/Dhaka Asia/Dacca
Link Asia/Shanghai Asia/Harbin
Link Asia/Urumqi Asia/Kashgar
Link Asia/Kathmandu Asia/Katmandu
Link Asia/Macau Asia/Macao
Link Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh Asia/Saigon
......
# <pre>
# This file is in the public domain, so clarified as of
# 2009-05-17 by Arthur David Olson.
......@@ -14,7 +13,7 @@ Zone Etc/UTC 0 - UTC
Zone Etc/UCT 0 - UCT
# The following link uses older naming conventions,
# but it belongs here, not in the file `backward',
# but it belongs here, not in the file 'backward',
# as functions like gmtime load the "GMT" file to handle leap seconds properly.
# We want this to work even on installations that omit the other older names.
Link Etc/GMT GMT
......
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# <pre>
# This file is in the public domain, so clarified as of
# 2009-05-17 by Arthur David Olson.
......
......@@ -3,21 +3,21 @@
# This file is in the public domain, so clarified as of
# 2009-05-17 by Arthur David Olson.
#
# From Paul Eggert (2013-05-27):
# From Paul Eggert (2014-07-18):
# This file contains a table of two-letter country codes. Columns are
# separated by a single tab. Lines beginning with '#' are comments.
# Although all text currently uses ASCII encoding, this is planned to
# change to UTF-8 soon. The columns of the table are as follows:
#
# This file contains a table with the following columns:
# 1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code, current as of
# ISO 3166-1 Newsletter VI-15 (2013-05-10). See: Updates on ISO 3166
# ISO 3166-1 Newsletter VI-16 (2013-07-11). See: Updates on ISO 3166
# http://www.iso.org/iso/home/standards/country_codes/updates_on_iso_3166.htm
# 2. The usual English name for the coded region,
# chosen so that alphabetic sorting of subsets produces helpful lists.
# This is not the same as the English name in the ISO 3166 tables.
#
# Columns are separated by a single tab.
# The table is sorted by country code.
#
# Lines beginning with `#' are comments.
#
# This table is intended as an aid for users, to help them select time
# zone data appropriate for their practical needs. It is not intended
# to take or endorse any position on legal or territorial claims.
......
#
# In the following text, the symbol '#' introduces
# a comment, which continues from that symbol until
# a comment, which continues from that symbol until
# the end of the line. A plain comment line has a
# whitespace character following the comment indicator.
# There are also special comment lines defined below.
# A special comment will always have a non-whitespace
# There are also special comment lines defined below.
# A special comment will always have a non-whitespace
# character in column 2.
#
# A blank line should be ignored.
......@@ -15,17 +15,22 @@
# are transmitted by almost all time services.
#
# The first column shows an epoch as a number of seconds
# since 1900.0 and the second column shows the number of
# seconds that must be added to UTC to compute TAI for
# any timestamp at or after that epoch. The value on
# each line is valid from the indicated initial instant
# until the epoch given on the next one or indefinitely
# into the future if there is no next line.
# since 1 January 1900, 00:00:00 (1900.0 is also used to
# indicate the same epoch.) Both of these time stamp formats
# ignore the complexities of the time scales that were
# used before the current definition of UTC at the start
# of 1972. (See note 3 below.)
# The second column shows the number of seconds that
# must be added to UTC to compute TAI for any timestamp
# at or after that epoch. The value on each line is
# valid from the indicated initial instant until the
# epoch given on the next one or indefinitely into the
# future if there is no next line.
# (The comment on each line shows the representation of
# the corresponding initial epoch in the usual
# the corresponding initial epoch in the usual
# day-month-year format. The epoch always begins at
# 00:00:00 UTC on the indicated day. See Note 5 below.)
#
#
# Important notes:
#
# 1. Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is often referred to
......@@ -33,7 +38,7 @@
# longer used, and the use of GMT to designate UTC is
# discouraged.
#
# 2. The UTC time scale is realized by many national
# 2. The UTC time scale is realized by many national
# laboratories and timing centers. Each laboratory
# identifies its realization with its name: Thus
# UTC(NIST), UTC(USNO), etc. The differences among
......@@ -44,10 +49,10 @@
# by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures
# (BIPM). See www.bipm.fr for more information.
#
# 3. The current defintion of the relationship between UTC
# and TAI dates from 1 January 1972. A number of different
# time scales were in use before than epoch, and it can be
# quite difficult to compute precise timestamps and time
# 3. The current definition of the relationship between UTC
# and TAI dates from 1 January 1972. A number of different
# time scales were in use before that epoch, and it can be
# quite difficult to compute precise timestamps and time
# intervals in those "prehistoric" days. For more information,
# consult:
#
......@@ -58,36 +63,34 @@
# of Time," Proc. of the IEEE, Vol. 79, pp. 894-905,
# July, 1991.
#
# 4. The insertion of leap seconds into UTC is currently the
# responsibility of the International Earth Rotation Service,
# which is located at the Paris Observatory:
#
# Central Bureau of IERS
# 61, Avenue de l'Observatoire
# 75014 Paris, France.
# 4. The decision to insert a leap second into UTC is currently
# the responsibility of the International Earth Rotation and
# Reference Systems Service. (The name was changed from the
# International Earth Rotation Service, but the acronym IERS
# is still used.)
#
# Leap seconds are announced by the IERS in its Bulletin C
# Leap seconds are announced by the IERS in its Bulletin C.
#
# See hpiers.obspm.fr or www.iers.org for more details.
# See www.iers.org for more details.
#
# All national laboratories and timing centers use the
# data from the BIPM and the IERS to construct their
# local realizations of UTC.
# Every national laboratory and timing center uses the
# data from the BIPM and the IERS to construct UTC(lab),
# their local realization of UTC.
#
# Although the definition also includes the possibility
# of dropping seconds ("negative" leap seconds), this has
# never been done and is unlikely to be necessary in the
# of dropping seconds ("negative" leap seconds), this has
# never been done and is unlikely to be necessary in the
# foreseeable future.
#
# 5. If your system keeps time as the number of seconds since
# some epoch (e.g., NTP timestamps), then the algorithm for
# assigning a UTC time stamp to an event that happens during a positive
# leap second is not well defined. The official name of that leap
# second is 23:59:60, but there is no way of representing that time
# in these systems.
# Many systems of this type effectively stop the system clock for
# one second during the leap second and use a time that is equivalent
# to 23:59:59 UTC twice. For these systems, the corresponding TAI
# leap second is not well defined. The official name of that leap
# second is 23:59:60, but there is no way of representing that time
# in these systems.
# Many systems of this type effectively stop the system clock for
# one second during the leap second and use a time that is equivalent
# to 23:59:59 UTC twice. For these systems, the corresponding TAI
# timestamp would be obtained by advancing to the next entry in the
# following table when the time equivalent to 23:59:59 UTC
# is used for the second time. Thus the leap second which
......@@ -102,7 +105,7 @@
#
# If your system realizes the leap second by repeating 00:00:00 UTC twice
# (this is possible but not usual), then the advance to the next entry
# in the table must occur the second time that a time equivlent to
# in the table must occur the second time that a time equivalent to
# 00:00:00 UTC is used. Thus, using the same example as above:
#
# ...
......@@ -112,13 +115,16 @@
# ...
#
# in both cases the use of timestamps based on TAI produces a smooth
# time scale with no discontinuity in the time interval.
#
# This complexity would not be needed for negative leap seconds (if they
# are ever used). The UTC time would skip 23:59:59 and advance from
# 23:59:58 to 00:00:00 in that case. The TAI offset would decrease by
# 1 second at the same instant. This is a much easier situation to deal
# with, since the difficulty of unambiguously representing the epoch
# time scale with no discontinuity in the time interval. However,
# although the long-term behavior of the time scale is correct in both
# methods, the second method is technically not correct because it adds
# the extra second to the wrong day.
#
# This complexity would not be needed for negative leap seconds (if they
# are ever used). The UTC time would skip 23:59:59 and advance from
# 23:59:58 to 00:00:00 in that case. The TAI offset would decrease by
# 1 second at the same instant. This is a much easier situation to deal
# with, since the difficulty of unambiguously representing the epoch
# during the leap second does not arise.
#
# Questions or comments to:
......@@ -126,66 +132,68 @@
# Time and Frequency Division
# NIST
# Boulder, Colorado
# jlevine@boulder.nist.gov
# Judah.Levine@nist.gov
#
# Last Update of leap second values: 11 January 2012
#
# The following line shows this last update date in NTP timestamp
# The following line shows this last update date in NTP timestamp
# format. This is the date on which the most recent change to
# the leap second data was added to the file. This line can
# be identified by the unique pair of characters in the first two
# be identified by the unique pair of characters in the first two
# columns as shown below.
#
#$ 3535228800
#
# The NTP timestamps are in units of seconds since the NTP epoch,
# which is 1900.0. The Modified Julian Day number corresponding
# to the NTP time stamp, X, can be computed as
# which is 1 January 1900, 00:00:00. The Modified Julian Day number
# corresponding to the NTP time stamp, X, can be computed as
#
# X/86400 + 15020
#
# where the first term converts seconds to days and the second
# term adds the MJD corresponding to 1900.0. The integer portion
# of the result is the integer MJD for that day, and any remainder
# is the time of day, expressed as the fraction of the day since 0
# hours UTC. The conversion from day fraction to seconds or to
# hours, minutes, and seconds may involve rounding or truncation,
# depending on the method used in the computation.
# where the first term converts seconds to days and the second
# term adds the MJD corresponding to the time origin defined above.
# The integer portion of the result is the integer MJD for that
# day, and any remainder is the time of day, expressed as the
# fraction of the day since 0 hours UTC. The conversion from day
# fraction to seconds or to hours, minutes, and seconds may involve
# rounding or truncation, depending on the method used in the
# computation.
#
# The data in this file will be updated periodically as new leap
# The data in this file will be updated periodically as new leap
# seconds are announced. In addition to being entered on the line
# above, the update time (in NTP format) will be added to the basic
# above, the update time (in NTP format) will be added to the basic
# file name leap-seconds to form the name leap-seconds.<NTP TIME>.
# In addition, the generic name leap-seconds.list will always point to
# In addition, the generic name leap-seconds.list will always point to
# the most recent version of the file.
#
# This update procedure will be performed only when a new leap second
# is announced.
# is announced.
#
# The following entry specifies the expiration date of the data
# in this file in units of seconds since 1900.0. This expiration date
# will be changed at least twice per year whether or not a new leap
# second is announced. These semi-annual changes will be made no
# later than 1 June and 1 December of each year to indicate what
# action (if any) is to be taken on 30 June and 31 December,
# in this file in units of seconds since the origin at the instant
# 1 January 1900, 00:00:00. This expiration date will be changed
# at least twice per year whether or not a new leap second is
# announced. These semi-annual changes will be made no later
# than 1 June and 1 December of each year to indicate what
# action (if any) is to be taken on 30 June and 31 December,
# respectively. (These are the customary effective dates for new
# leap seconds.) This expiration date will be identified by a
# unique pair of characters in columns 1 and 2 as shown below.
# In the unlikely event that a leap second is announced with an
# In the unlikely event that a leap second is announced with an
# effective date other than 30 June or 31 December, then this
# file will be edited to include that leap second as soon as it is
# announced or at least one month before the effective date
# (whichever is later).
# If an announcement by the IERS specifies that no leap second is
# scheduled, then only the expiration date of the file will
# (whichever is later).
# If an announcement by the IERS specifies that no leap second is
# scheduled, then only the expiration date of the file will
# be advanced to show that the information in the file is still
# current -- the update time stamp, the data and the name of the file
# current -- the update time stamp, the data and the name of the file
# will not change.
#
# Updated through IERS Bulletin C46
# File expires on: 28 June 2014
# Updated through IERS Bulletin C48
# File expires on: 28 June 2015
#
#@ 3612902400
#@ 3644438400
#
2272060800 10 # 1 Jan 1972
2287785600 11 # 1 Jul 1972
......@@ -222,10 +230,10 @@
# computed. Note that the hash computation
# ignores comments and whitespace characters
# in data lines. It includes the NTP values
# of both the last modification time and the
# of both the last modification time and the
# expiration time of the file, but not the
# white space on those lines.
# the hash line is also ignored in the
# computation.
#
#h 1151a8f e85a5069 9000fcdb 3d5e5365 1d505b37
#h a4862ccd c6f43c6 964f3604 85944a26 b5cfad4e
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# <pre>
# This file is in the public domain, so clarified as of
# 2009-05-17 by Arthur David Olson.
......
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# <pre>
# This file is in the public domain, so clarified as of
# 2009-05-17 by Arthur David Olson.
......
......@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
case $#-$1 in
2-|2-0*|2-*[!0-9]*)
echo "$0: wild year - $1" >&2
echo "$0: wild year: $1" >&2
exit 1 ;;
esac
......@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ case $#-$2 in
*) exit 1 ;;
esac ;;
2-*)
echo "$0: wild type - $2" >&2 ;;
echo "$0: wild type: $2" >&2 ;;
esac
echo "$0: usage is $0 year even|odd|uspres|nonpres|nonuspres" >&2
......
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